Monday, October 4, 2010

SHORT STORIES

All of the short stories we have read demonstrate many of the literary terms we have studied.  Give me examples from the different stories of:  Thank You M'am, Charles, Ransom of Red Chief, and All Summer in a Day

SITUATIONAL IRONY

INDIRECT CHARACTERIZATION

DIRECT CHARACTERIZATION

VERBAL IRONY

DIALECT

DRAMATIC IRONY

3RD PERSON OMNISCIENT

1ST PERSON  POINT OF VIEW

FORESHADOWING

SIMILE

METAPHOR

HYPERBOLE

What themes cross over from one short story to another? Give the theme(s) and tell how they are shown in the stories.  Are any of these themes the same as themes from your summer reading books and/or The Outsiders?  Explain. 

77 comments:

  1. This is just a test to make sure that the comment option is working correctly on my blog page. Ms. Liberman

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  2. Situational Irony is prevalent in many of the stories. I thin that it is most dramatic in Chrles because we are led to believe that Charles is a horrid classmate of sweet little Laurie, and inthe end we find out that Laurie is in fact Charles

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  3. Situational Irony is in a lot of he short stories we have read i think that in the story Thank You Ma'm when we expect the old woman to be slow and not strong, but she ends up showing the boy she was not. Also when the boy expects her to be mad at him and is not is situational irony.

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  4. Indirect Characterization was used in many of the short stories.
    In All Summer in a Day when Margot stood away from all the other children it told us that she was secretive and kept to herself.
    In Charles when Laurie would come home and start yelling at his dad or calling him names was how we realized Laurie was disrespectful.
    In Thank You, M'am when Roger doesn't run away when the old woman tells him to go wash up, was showing that Roger didn't want her to think he was unreliable and dishonest.

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  5. Situational Irony is in Charles and The Ransom of The Red Chief. In Charles, we don't expect Laurie to be Charles the trouble maker. In Ransome Of The Red Chief you don't think the kid would like being kidnapped, but, he doesn't even want to go home. In both of these stories there are situational irony and they both have a theme in common. "Don't judge a book by its cover." Laurie ends out being a little liar while his parents think he is a angel. Bill and sam didn't think the child in ransom of the red chief could cause the 2 guys so much pain.

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  6. All the four stories had dialect. From thank you,m'ma an example is "You a lie". Another example is All summer in a day. One line would be, One kid said, "Where's teacher". In the story Ransom of Red Chief is Billy says "I takes him by the necks of his cloths and drags him down the mountian". The Last story was Charles. Laurie said "I didnt learn nothing" All these stories had poor grammar.

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  7. Situational Irony is constantly covered in these three short stories. It is expressed in Charles, when we don't expect Charles to be a trouble making kid, but in the end it is Laurie. In Thank You M'am, the boy expects the lady walking down the street to be easy going and weak, but it turns out, that she is strong and upright, and he learns his lesson. In Ransom of the Red Cheif, the kidnappers expect to make money of the return of John, but in the end, they end up losing money by paying Red Cheifs parents. These are just a few examples of Situational Irony in these short stories.

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  8. All of these four stories have direct characterization. Direct characterization in Thank You, Ma’am is shown in the following passage: She was a large woman with a large purse that had everything in it but hammer and nails. In Charles, direct characterization is shown when the story says this portion: The day my son Laurie started kindergarten he renounced corduroy overalls with bibs and began wearing blue jeans with a belt. All Summer in a Day had direct characterization when it describes Margot. The book said: She was a very frail girl who looked as if she had been lost in the rain for years and the rain had washed out the blue from her eyes and the red from her mouth and the yellow from her hair. The Ransom of Red Chief had direct characterization where it says: The kid was a boy of ten, with bas-relief freckles, and hair the color of the magazine you buy at the news-stand when you want to catch a train. All of these four short stories have direct characterization.

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  9. Direct Charaterization was used in many of the short stories.
    In "Thank You, Ma'am", it is shown when the author says "She was a large woman with a large purse that had everything in it but hammer and nails."
    In the story "Charles", direct characterization is shown when the story says "The day my son Laurie started kindergarden he renounced corduroy overalls with bibs and began wearing blue jeans with a belt."
    In "All Summer in a Day", the dircet characterization was shown when the author describes Margot. In the story it says "She was a very frail girl who looked as if she had been lost in the rain for years and the rain had washed out the blue from her eyes and the red from her mouth and yellow from her hair."
    In "The Ransom of Red Cheif", it says "The kid was a boy of ten, with bas-relief freckles, and the magazine you buy at the news-stand when you want to catch a train." The short stories have direct characterization in all of them.

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  10. Both "The Ransom of Red Chief" and "All Summer in a Day" had many similes in them. Here's one from Ransom; "I dodged, and heard a heavy thud and a kind of a sigh from Bill, like a horse gives when you take his saddle off." This is when in the stroy Red Chief throws a rock at Bill. This is showing how tired Bill is of Red Chief.An example of a simile in "All Summer in a Day" is; "But they were running and turning their faces up to the sky and feeling the sun on their cheeks like a warm iron;" This is when the childern first go outside and are feeling the sun for the first time. This is showing how warm the sun really was to them and how differnt it was from their typical day. Both stories were written with many comparisions and were beautifully written. The two stories for the most part are given details through comparisions.

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  11. In many of the short stories, there is foreshadow. For example, in "Thank You M'am" the author said he is about to steal the purse from the old lady and he gets caught. In "Charles" they give little hints about laurie being charles. when he comes home late to school and he said Charles had to stay after school. In "Ransom of Red Chief" they talk about the quiet town and how there is very little police. in "All Summer in a Day" they lock her in a closet and the scientist predict that the sun will come out that day.

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  12. Hayden P, those are good examples. Now trace situational irony into any of the other stories in which you found it to play a part. That will be a good exercise to show you really understand teh use of this kind of irony in literature.

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  13. Divya, those were excellent examples of the use of indirect characterization! Good job! I would be interested in your ideas on the questions posted for ASD. Pick one and give me your opinions.

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  14. Eln, good examples of situational irony. Dod Thank you, M'am have any also? If so, give me an example. I like hopw you added in their common theme. Good job! You may want to discuss one of the ASD questions posted also. I'd enjoy seeing your thoughts.

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  15. Tatum, I think you may have confused dialogue with dialect which is very easy to do. Dialogue is any converstion in the story, but dialect is a unique kind of talking like you saw in Thank you,M'am and Red Chief. It shows an unusual accent. I would like to see you answer one of teh questions on the top of the page from All Summer in a Day. Thanks, Ms. Liberman

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  16. Kensi, great job!! Give a shot to answering one of the questions on All Summer in a Day on the top of the page. Good job with situational irony.

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  17. Dylan, great coverage of direct characterization. Good for you! Try one of the open ended questions on ASD at the top of the page. Good job!

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  18. Zara, you did a great job of picking out passages with direct characterization. Good job! Why don't you go back and see if you can now find examples of indirect characterization in each story and tell what each example says about the character through words or actions. That will be a good review for the test.

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  19. Emma, good choice of similes. There were so many, it is hard to pick out just two. Why don't you answer one of the open ended questions at eth top of the page form ASD. I'd like to see yuor thougths on them.

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  20. Quentin, good stab at foreshadowing. Some of those were great like Charles and Red Chief. The others aren't exactly hints at some future event. The very 1st sentence in Red chief is a perfect example. Go back and read it, and you'll see what I mean. It's especially effective in mystery books. Look for foreshadowing in the next LRB you read. Good job!

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  21. In the short stories that we have read so far, I have seen ironic moments. But in three short stories, I have seen times of situational irony. In Charles, the situational irony was at the end when you figure out that Laurie is Charles, the trouble-maker from class that Laurie has been going on and on about everyday after school. In Thank You Ma'am, the situational irony is at the part when Luella Bates Washington Jones beats up the boy instead of vis-versa. Also in this story, there is another example of this kind of irony. It is when the woman gives the boy the money he was attempting to steal. And last but not least, in the Ransom of Read Chief, the situational irony is when Ebenezer Dorset sends Bill and Sam a letter saying that he will only accept to take his son back if they pay him. The two men are losing money instead of gaining some! Also in this short story, another example of situational irony is when Johnny is right behind Bill as he banters on about how he sent the boy home because he couldn't take anymore from this child. These stories all have something in common: they have situational irony which adds some humor into them.

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  22. I think situational irony is a big part of Charles and Ransom of Red Chief. In Charles we expected Charles to be the trouble-maker in the kindergarten class, but we find out that Charles is actually Laurie. In Ransom of Red Chief we expect Johnny to hate being taken by Bill and Sam and to want to go home, but he actually loves being kidnapped and doesn't want to go. Also, we don't expect that Bill and Sam end up paying Ebenezer Dorset $250 to take back Laurie.

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  23. I meant to say Johnny not Laurie, my bad!

    Elan,
    I really liked your comment! Those were the same examples I had so I get where you are coming from. I never thought of that theme for both of the stories, so I learned something new! Great job!

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  24. In addition to my earlier post, there were many exapmles of indirect characterization in the stories.
    In "All Summer in a Day", when Margot keeping to her self and stood away from the other kids told us that she was shy, secertive, and kept to herself.
    In "Charles", when Laurie would come home yelling at his mom and dad or calling him names was how the story made us realized how rude and misbehaved he was.
    In "Thank You Ma'am", when Roger does not want to run away when the old woman tells him to go wash up, he was showing that he did not want Ms.Jones to think he was dishonest or untrustworthy.
    Most stories we have read have indirect characterization.

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  25. There was situational irony in the all of the stories. In the story Thank You Ma'am the situational irony was that that Ms. Jones did not turn the boy into the cops. The situational irony in the story Charles is that the little boy has lyed yo his parents about a little boy named Charles when it ends up that the lttle boy is charles. The situational irony in All Summer In A Day is that they have left margot in the closet for the whole time that the sun was out.One example of situational irony in Ransom of Redchief is that the men ended up paying the father for te boy

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  26. In, "Ransom of Red Chief" and, "Charles", dramatic irony made parts of the stories interesting and funny. In, "Charles", I had a feeling that Charles was actually Laurie, but his mom was completely fooled. In, "Ransom of Red Chief", it was funny how Johnny followed Bill all the way back to the cave, when Bill thought he sent him home.

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  27. In all the stories that we have read there is at least 1 case of situational irony. In charles the irony is that Laurie tells his parents about charles who you expect to be real, but instead it is just a lie to see how his parents react. In thank ya ma'm you expect the boy to take her purse and get away when she walks out of the room, but instead he stays within her view at all times. He did this because he did not want to lose her trust. Finally, in Ransom of Red Cheif when Sam and Bill take the boy to the cave and he misbehaves Sam threatens to take the boy home so the kid behaves. Most kids in this situation would want to go home, but instead thr boy wants to stay with them.

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  28. Quentin,
    I like how you used foreshadowing. I never looked at the story that way. Good Job!

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  29. In "Ransom of the Red Chief" there is one part where there is dramatic irony. When Bill thinks that he has sent Johnny home, but Johnny is standing eight feet behind him. Sam and the audience knows that he is behind him but Bill does not. This is an example of dramatic irony.

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  30. Ean,
    I liked how you described situational irony in all of the short stories.
    Great Job!!

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  31. In Ransom of the Red Chief there is a major part of the story that is an example of dramatic irony.Bill begins to explain to Sam that he couldn't take Johnny anymore. He explained he had sent him home, and was happy he had done it. The ironic part was that Johnny had been standing behind Bill the whole time.

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  32. Emma,
    I really loved your comment because of the great detail. You used some great words to fully describe the similies from Ransom of the Red Chief and Charles. Great Job!
    Lauren M.

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  33. When thinking about situational irony, I thought about The Ransom Red Chief the most. An example of that would have to be when the kidnappers, Sam and Bill, were expection old Ebenezer to accept their offer about that ransom for his son, but instead he wrote them back saying that they needed to pay him $250 to take his son off of their hands.

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  34. In "Ransom of Red Chief" the thieves have dialect. They have bad grammer but and are exactly quite stupid but use big words such as philoprogenitiveness(love of children). In Charles, the mom has good grammer while the son has bad grammer.

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  35. Emma,
    You put some very strong examples of similes from those two stories. They were very detailed and you used a lot of description! Good job!
    Nikki K

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  36. Tatum,

    Good observation! I would never have noticed that all of them had bad grammer. Well done.

    Mariah

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  37. Joel W, i agree with your comment about dialect in the story, "Ransom of Red Chief". They do have dialect and good job for noticing it

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  38. 1st person point of view was in the story "Charles", and in the story "Ransom of Red Chief". In the Charles story, the story is told from the mother's point of view using words like we, I, and us. In Ransom of Red Chief, the story is told from the perspective of Sam, one of the kidnappers.

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  39. Nikki, you gave a good example of situational irony. Something you might want to add is situational irony from other stories.
    Good job.

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  40. O. Henry used many similes in the story The Ransom of Red Chief. First, when Sam says "...like a horse gives out when you take his saddle off" referring to when Bill gets hit with Johnny's sling. Second, when Sam says "...I was up in that tree as well hidden as a tree toad..." describing himself in the tree waiting for the messenger to deliver E. Dorset's letter. Third, when Sam also says "...howl like a calliope and fastened himself as tight as a leech to Bill's leg" talking about how Johnny reacted when he realized he had to stay with his father. Last, when Sam says "...peeled him away gradually, like a porous plaster" also talking about how Johnny reacted when he realized he had to stay with his father. These were some similes I found in O. Henry's story, The Ransom of Red Chief.

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  41. Sarah, good job finding all those situational irony examples! I completely forgot about the one in Thank You Ma'm, where she didn't turn in the boy to the cops. I also agree with your other four examples. Good job!

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  42. Here are some examples of situational irony in the short stories that we read in reading.
    In "Thank you, Ma'm", The situational irony was when the kid attempted to take the old woman's bag but instead, the bag's strap snapped and the giant bag took the boy down.
    The situational irony for "Charles", was that Laurie turned out doing all the trouble at school not the made up kid, Charles.
    There were many examples of situational irony in
    "The Ransom of Red Chief". One of them was, instead of Johnny being scared and quiet for being kidnapped he was shouting and yelling and harassing Bill. Another example was instead of receiving $1500 at 12Âșclock, they payed $250 to get rid of Johnny.

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  43. In the short stories we have read as a class, i noticed there has been dialect in two of them, Ransom Red Chief and Thank You M'am. In Ransom of Red Chief the thieves used a uneducated southern dialect. Also in Thank You M'am the boy and the woman used dialect didn't sound educated as well. I know this because, they use poor grammar. An example of that is in Thank You M'am when the woman tells the boy "You a Lie!" This shows that using incorrect grammar when you talk makes people think you are uneducated.

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  44. In all of the short stories there has been situational irony. In Thank Ya Mam it was when Ms. Jones didn't turn the boy into the police. In Charles it was when Lauries mom found out that Laurie was Charles. In All Summer in a Day it was when the kids left Margot in the closet when the sun was out instead of letting her out. Lastly in Ransom of the Red Cheif it was when Johnny said he would rather be with Sam and Bill instead of going home.

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  45. Corsica, great job at finding all those similes. Some of those are really funny. My favorite is "peeled him away like porous piece of plaster" I really makes a picture in my mind of both plaster and a child clinging to an adults leg. Some of those similes I forgot about. Great Work!

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  46. Sydney, I really like your very thorough description of the situational irony in all the stories. It was really complete and it gives a good view of it all.Nicely done!

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  47. WHEN I THOUGHT OF SITUATIONAL IRONY IT MADE ME THINK OF THANK YOU M'AM THE MOST BECAUSE OF HOW THE BOY THOUGHT THAT MUGGING A LARGE WOMEN. WAS THE QUICKEST WAY TO GET CASH FOR SHOES AND MABEY FOOD. THE IRONIC PART WAS SHE ENDED UP BEATING HIM. BUT NOT ONLY DID SHE SCARE HIM BY TACKING HIM BACK TO HER PLACE SHE ALSO GAVE HIM THE 10 DOLLARS FOR THE SHOES.

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  48. I liked anoop's comment the best because it was very well written and it was one of the only comments iv'e seen that actually has quotation marks!

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  49. Anoop's comment got my attention because it is long and has quotes on it. IT is appropriate for the question he answered, and gives through explanation and thoughts.

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  50. The dramatic irony in Ransom of the Red Chief is when Bill says he made the kid go home, showed him the place, and kicked him their. What he didn't know, was that Johny had actually followed him back to the cave, and was standing right behind him. This part is funny, because Sam actually asks him if their were any heart diseases in his family. HE tells Bill to turn around and he sits on the ground, picking at the grass. Knowing that it meant the kid was just going to keep on his nerve.

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  51. All of the strories have situational irony. In yes mam you expect the old lady not to fight back and just give the boy the purse but instead she fought back. In Ransom of Redchief you expect the boy to want to go home but instead he wants to stay with the kidnappers. In all summer in a day you expect the teacher to make sure that every kid is there when they were going outside, but instead she probably could careless and did not check.

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  52. I liked Jonathans because evnthough it was short i felt it got the point and he did not to say a lot to get the point across.

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  53. I think there is situational irony in many of the stories. One example in "Ransom of Red Chief is at the exact time that the kidnappers are supposed to be recieving $2000, they are paying $250. Another example is when he went up to the hill expecting to see men with pitchforks scaling the countryside but instead saw a calm, peaceful village.

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  54. Dylan,

    I liked your examples of direct characterization.You found a lot! Good job.

    T.C.

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  55. T.C, You found two great situational irony examples from "Ransom of Red Chief" that would have never would have picked up on! Great Job!

    -Zara N.

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  56. Situational irony is widly used trough out short stories.Situational irony is quite a funny thing cause its usualy were the read knows something that the character don't. So there for the charact react funny cause of this.Situational irony can alos be like in the short story Ransom of Red Chief, one example of stituational irony is where they thought the town would want Johhny back but, it turns out that there happy hes is gone.

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  57. Victoria that's a great comment. It think that you realy got the idea of that.

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  58. Kensi, I liked your examples that you used in your post. I also agree with all three of your examples.

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  59. Situational Irony is expressed through Thank You M'am, Ransom of Red Chief, and lastly Charles. In thank you m'am roger doesn't expect Ms. Jones to be a strong woman and she is. In Ransom of Red Chief Bill and Sam are not expecting Johnny to enjoy being kidnapped, and finally in Charles we were not expecting Laurie to be Charles and do bad things.

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  60. Zara, you gave excellent examples of indirect characterization and expressed each one perfectly. Good job!

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  61. Will J., unfortunately, you confused dramatic irony and situational irony. Dramatic is when teh reader knows something the character does not. Your example showed situational but you described it as dramatic. Make sure you have that clear! You gave a good example of situational irony.

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  62. Eric, I like your comment is worded very well.

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  63. Jonathan, you were right about how there was situational irony in all of the short stories. I can tell you analyzed the stories really well and put a lot of thought into it. It was a great comment!

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  64. There are examples of situational irony throughout the story. In Thank You M'am, Ms. Jones gives the boy ten dollars even though the boy tried to take it from her. In Charles, we think that there is a very bad kid in Laurie's class. Then, we find out that the kid is really Laurie! In All Summer In a Day, the sun rarely comes out. When it finally does, the kids lock Margot in a closet because she is different, and she misses the time the sun comes out. In The Ransom of Red Chief, the kidnappers end up losing money trying to get rid of the kid even though they were planning to gain money.

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  65. All of the storys we have read have a common device throughout them: situational irony. In "Thank You Ma'm", Roger,in desperation, attempts to steal a lady's purse late one night. When we assume this would be an easy task, it turns into situational irony as Roger is thrown to the ground and caught by the weight of the purse. In "Charles", we all expect Charles to be some delinquent demon child that terrorises Laurie and the class, where in fact Charles IS Laurie. In "All Summer in a Day", we all expect the children to not feel bad, or even forget about leaving Margot in the closet, when in fact they solemnly remember and are driven by guilt to an extent of extreme apology. Finally, in "The Ransom of Red Chief", you expect the boy to be overwhelmed in fear, being kidnapped and all, but instead he is overcome with joy and is having the greatest time of his life. If you look hard enough, you can spot situational irony everywhere, and it was simple to see it runs throughout these stories.

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  66. Jonathan, I liked your comment, but I think your missing out a bit on situational irony. To state situational irony in a story, you must tell what one expects to happen, and then what actually happens, rather than stating only what really happens, like you did in your comment. Besides that, I felt you did a fair job.

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  67. Sydney and Noah, you both did aexceptional jobs of carefully and clearly showing the many examples of situational irony in this unit. Both of you selected good examples and wrote your ideas carefully and beautifully. Good jobs!!

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  68. Anoop, you too did a good job of showing examples of situational irony in this unit. You wrote well and picked good examples. Good job!

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  69. Corsica, you did a very nice job showing similes in Ransom of Red Chief, but it would have been even better if you had included at least one other story such as All Summer in a Day. You wrote quite well though and did a nice job!

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  70. There were many examples of irony running through all of the stories. I particually noticed situational irony.

    Thank You Ma'm- You thought that the boy would be able to take down the lady, when really it was the lady who beat up the fat old lady.

    Charles- You had no idea that in the situation, "Charles" was Laurie.

    Summer Day- You expect that the kids would let Margot out when the sun comes out, but they leave her there for the 2 hours.

    Red Chief- You expected Dorset to pay the ransom, but instead, Bill and Sam pay him.

    REPLY:
    Sarah- I liked your example for Thank You Ma'm. I hadn't yet thought of that, but it really is also situational irony in the story.

    Ms. Liberman- I tried to post on Thursday during advisory study hall, but I just realized my comments did not go through. It is fine if they are counted late, I just wanted to let you know. Thanks!

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  71. Lauren
    Thank you for the comment, and i really enjoyed yours as well it was straight forward and stated it like dramatic irony. Good Job

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  72. During all of the stories I thought one universal theme was young doesn't always mean innocent.

    In Thank You, Ma'm young didn't always mean innocent because even though Roger was young he was try to steal from an old lady.

    In Charles young didn't always mean innocent because Laurie was doing terrible things, hurting people, and getting people into trouble but blamed it all on the nonexistent boy Charles.

    In All Summer In a Day young didn't always mean innocent because the kids were all only nine years old, yet they were impudent bullies.

    In Ransom of The Red Chief young didn't always mean innocent because Johnny was always hurting Bill by trying to scalp him, feed him sand, and make him act like a horse so he could ride on him. Johnny also did many other crazy things to Bill.

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  73. Ryan, I really liked the situational irony that you thought of. I also agree that it seemed like the teacher would have noticed Margot missing or just checked to make sure everyone was there.

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  74. Ally, your comments are well stated and you chose good examples. However, it seems that you did not complete it on time. I am grading it as late; let me know if I am inaccurate about that. Good analysis!

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  75. Eric and Ryan, you both did a fairly good job, but both of you only covered 3 of the 4 stories although all of the stories had good examples. Ryan, also make sure to edit your work carefully before posting it.

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  76. Indirect characterization was in all four stories. Indirect characterization is when the author tells about or describes the character with dialogue, actions or what other people say about him or her.

    An example of this term in "All Summer in a Day" is “‘No,' said Margot, falling back. They surged about her, caught her up and bore her, protesting, and then pleading and crying, back into a tunnel, a room, a closet, where they slammed and locked the door. They stood looking at the door and saw it tremble from her beating and throwing herself at it. They heard her muffled cries. Then smiling, they turned and went out, just as the teacher arrived." This excerpt shows that the children who locked up Margot probably enjoyed what they had done to her, and they have a cruel sense about them.

    An example from "Charles" was when Laurie was talking to his parents. His mother said to her husband, "Charles had to stay after school today. Everyone stayed with him."Continuing the conversation his father said to Laurie, "What does this Charles look like? What's his other name?" "He's bigger than me," Laurie replied "and he doesn't have any rubbers and he doesn't ever wear a jacket."I the next paragraph Shirley wrote in the mother's point of view, "Monday was the first Parent-Teachers meeting and the only the fact that the baby was sick kept me from going." These two sections give us a hint that Laurie was Charles.

    In the short story "Thank You M ‘am" an example of indirect characterization was when Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones is talking to Roger at the beginning right after he tried to steal her purse and she says, "You a lie!" We can infer that Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones isn't very educated. Also, when Roger tried to steal Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones’ purse it showed that he was in need of money or something in a lady’s purse.

    Lastly, in “Ransom of Red Chief” an example was when in the ransom letter Sam wrote “We have your boy concealed in a place far from Summit. It is useless for you or the most skilful detectives to attempt to find him.” If you noticed that skillful is spelled wrong you would have concluded that Sam is not very educated. As well as that, there is another example. Bill said, “You know, Sam, I've stood by you without batting an eye in earthquakes, fire and flood -- in poker games, dynamite outrages, police raids, train robberies and cyclones. I never lost my nerve yet till we kidnapped that two-legged skyrocket of a kid. He's got me going. You won't leave me long with him, will you, Sam?" This short part of speaking on Bill’s part shows that he is worried about the kid and about himself. He is worried that Johnny might do something horrible to him while Sam is gone.

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  77. Everyone is talking about "Situational Irony," in Thank you M'am but what is the "Dramatic Irony." Need this answered for my son's packet of information he has to write.

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